Phoronix - updated benchmarks

https://www.phoronix.com/review/intel-ubuntu2404-fedora40
Here are some fresh benchmarks looking at how Ubuntu 24.04 LTS and Fedora Workstation 40 are competing with Intel’s in-house Clear Linux distribution that offers aggressive x86_64 Linux performance defaults and the best possible out-of-the-box Linux performance on modern x86_64 hardware.

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Congratulations to the CL team! :smiley:

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Thanks for posting… Copied your link to the CL performance thread :wink:

Something not mentioned by reviewers is that Clear Linux defaults to CGROUPSv1 whereas most other Linux distributions default to CGROUPSv2. Some tests perform better with CGROUPSv1.

For fairer comparison with Clear Linux, systemd.unified_cgroup_hierarchy=0 is the command-line option to use CGROUPSv1. Moreover, CONFIG_CGROUP_RDMA is disabled in Clear.

systemd.unified_cgroup_hierarchy=0 cgroup_disable=rdma

I ran schbench five times while computing prime numbers on the CPU. Notice the difference between CGROUPSv2 and CGROUPSv1.

Ubuntu 24.04 CGROUPSv2 (stock kernel, no tuning)

$ ./schbench
Latency percentiles (usec)
        50.0th:   1001     931     855     947     899
        75.0th:   2828    2420    2428    2564    2468
        90.0th:   4648    3924    3956    4036    3940
        95.0th:   6552    5352    5496    5560    5240
       *99.0th:  10448    9136    8688    9264    8208
        99.5th:  11792   10832    9616   11024    9680
        99.9th:  14704   14096   13232   14640   12976
           max:  18364   20105   17489   19906   20140

Ubuntu 24.04 CGROUPSv2 (stock kernel, with tuning)

$ ./schbench
Latency percentiles (usec)
        50.0th:    651     639     719     749     619
        75.0th:   2212    2124    2212    2276    2156
        90.0th:   3404    3172    3492    3700    3236
        95.0th:   4824    4520    4856    5000    4520
       *99.0th:   7336    6664    7272    7496    6888
        99.5th:   8304    7592    8656    8464    7976
        99.9th:  11888   10928   11792   10672   10832
           max:  14881   14081   16048   12195   13832

Ubuntu 24.04 CGROUPSv1 (stock kernel, with tuning including boot args: systemd.unified_cgroup_hierarchy=0 cgroup_disable=rdma)

$ ./schbench
Latency percentiles (usec)
        50.0th:     31      31      30      31      31
        75.0th:    803     851     785     779     825
        90.0th:   2140    2164    2132    2132    2148
        95.0th:   2692    2732    2684    2676    2676
       *99.0th:   4092    4184    4184    3988    4020
        99.5th:   4920    4872    4904    4776    4020
        99.9th:   5976    5800    5832    5864    5848
           max:   8832    8388    7650    8824    7505

Ubuntu 24.04 CGROUPSv1 (rebuild kernel with config changes and -march=x86-64-v3 plus tuning including boot args: systemd.unified_cgroup_hierarchy=0 cgroup_disable=rdma)

$ ./schbench
Latency percentiles (usec)
        50.0th:     25      25      25      26      26
        75.0th:    675     683     575     657     657
        90.0th:   1938    2034    1934    1914    1950
        95.0th:   2532    2572    2524    2532    2556
       *99.0th:   3940    3988    3972    3956    3956
        99.5th:   4680    4824    4664    4824    4728
        99.9th:   5560    5592    5528    5560    5512
           max:   7647    7376    7749    7062    6914

Clear Linux CGROUPSv1 (ClearMod kernel, with tuning)

$ ./schbench
Latency percentiles (usec)
        50.0th:     28      29      29      29      29
        75.0th:    941     955     879     955     959
        90.0th:   1738    1726    1710    1738    1758
        95.0th:   2364    2380    2324    2340    2356
       *99.0th:   3444    3460    3348    3228    3348
        99.5th:   3764    3772    3708    3668    3668
        99.9th:   4984    4840    4552    4568    4552
           max:   7022    7223    6458    7061    6447

Interesting!

How did you tweak Ubuntu to have such improvements? Does the parameter you were talking about is a kernel argument ?
I wish to try it on Fedora.

Thanks !

It’s surprising to see that the Powersave option can compete with the Performance one. I’d like to have information about this (usage of watts, power profile by default, etc) but I do not find anything precise.

Yes, the kernel arguments mentioned. BTW, I added two more sections to the list.

  • Ubuntu stock kernel, no tuning
  • Rebuild kernel with config changes and -march=x86-64-v3